Document

Low prevalence of left atrial thrombus detected by transoesphageal echocardiogram in patients with arrhythmia prior to DC cardioversion

Patients requiring acute DC cardioversion (DCCV) for atrial fibrillation (AF) or flutter (AFlt) require exclusion of left atrial appendage (LAA) thrombus to reduce their risk of stroke. Transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE) is the gold standard modality but is invasive. Cardiac CT has a high negative predictive value for LA thrombus and is potentially an alternative to TOE in this population. We studied the prevalence of LAA thrombus and spontaneous echo contrast (SEC) in patients who required acute DCCV to determine the feasibility of using CT in this setting.

D. Hare, A. Pope, S. Kueh, J. Looi, N. van Pelt, R. Gabriel
Department of Cardiology, Middlemore Hospital, Auckland
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

Platelet count and platelet function testing in acute coronary syndromes

Platelet function testing may be a useful tool for tailoring antiplatelet therapy in acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Measurements of platelet function may be influenced by platelet count. We examined the relationship between platelet count and platelet function testing using two commercially available platelet function tests, VerifyNow and Multiplate.

K. Hally, L. Johnston, A. Holley, P. Larsen, S. Harding
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

Introduction and evaluation of total ambulatory management of patients undergoing coronary angiography and intervention

Transradial coronary angiography and intervention has permitted the introduction of “demedicalised” total ambulatory care. We aimed to assess the feasibility and success of this strategy for day case coronary angiography/PCI at Auckland City Hospital.

T. Gudex, S. Madenholt-Titley, M. McAleer, S. Savage, J. White, P. Ruygrok
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

Ticagrelor in the management of acute coronary syndromes

Ticagrelor reduces cardiovascular mortality in acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Limited data is available post hospital discharge particularly regarding compliance and tolerability. This study aimed to assess the use, adverse effects and patient opinion of ticagrelor, in comparison with PLATO trial findings.

S. Green, T. Cherian, C. Heald, M. Lee, G. Devlin
Waikato Hospital, Hamilton
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

Stent length and GP2B/3A Inhibitor use but not eGFR predict peri-procedural myocardial infarction in elective percutaneous coronary intervention

Peri-procedural myocardial infarction (PPMI) is common after elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and is associated with low eGFR. We sought to evaluate this relationship and determine predictors of PPMI.

C. Goh, A. Al-Fiadh, D. Clark, O. Farouque
Department of Cardiology, Austin Health, Melbourne, Australia
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

Diabetes causes the activation of the pro-ageing miRNA-34a in the human heart

Diabetes accelerates cellular ageing, contributing to disease development including cardiovascular diseases (CVD). MicroRNAs (miRs) are short, non-coding RNAs which modulate protein expression by negatively controlling RNA transcription, and are gaining interest due to their pathological role in CVD development. Recent studies showed activation of miR-34a in the ageing heart, contributing to age-related cardiac dysfunction. As diabetes also induces cardiac damage through accelerated cellular ageing, we hypothesised that miR-34a could be involved in diabetic CVD development.

I. Fomison-Nurse, P. Saxena, S. Coffey, A. Menon, R. Bunton, I. Galvin, A. Bahn, M. Williams, V. Cameron, R. Katare
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

Improved rates of secondary prevention medication following hospitalisation for an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in New Zealand (NZ): Results from the NZ ACS national audits of 2002, 2007 and 2012

Secondary prevention medications (aspirin, other anti-platelet agents, statins, beta-blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (ACE-I/ARBs)) following an Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) improve patients’ (pt) prognosis. The first National ACS audit (2002) identified a limited uptake of these medications. Subsequent audits in 2007 and 2012 allow comparison of the prescription rates over a decade.

C. Ellis, G. Gamble, G. Devlin, J. Elliott, A. Hamer, P. Matsis, M. Williams, R. Troughton, S. Mann, J. French, A. Richards, H. White, for the NZ Regional Cardiac Society ACS Audit Group and the CSANZ ‘SNAPSHOT’ ACS Audit Group.
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

A comparison of invasive angiography, revascularisation and time delays delivered to Australian and New Zealand non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction/unstable angina pectoris (NSTEMI/UAP) patients: results of the 2012 SNAPSHOT Bi-National acute coronary Syndrome (ACS) audit

Patients (pts) presenting with NSTEMI/UAP benefit from an invasive angiogram and appropriate revascularisation. Guidelines recommend the time to angiography should be < 24 hours for ‘high risk’ and < 72 hours for the remainder of these pts. We assessed New Zealand (NZ) and Australian (Aust) NSTEMI/UAP pts. C. Ellis, C. Hammett, J. French, T. Briffa, J. Lefkovitz, I. Ranasinghe, G. Devlin, J. Elliott, F. Turbull, J. Redfern, B. Aliprandi-Costa, C. Astley, G. Gamble, D. Brieger, D. Chew, for the Bi-National Acute Coronary Syndromes (ACS) ‘SNAPSHOT’ Audit Group Heart, Lung and Circulation - Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48 Abstract & full-text available.

A decade of improvement in investigations received and treatments delivered to New Zealand (NZ) ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients: Results from the NZACS national audits of 2002, 2007 and 2012

The first New Zealand (NZ) Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) National audit of 2002 was a collaborative effort between Clinicians and Nurses and demonstrated significant limitations to STEMI patient (pt) care. A momentum for change was created. Subsequent audits in 2007 and 2012 permit comparison of treatments and investigations over time.

J. Elliott, M. Williams, P. Matsis, G. Gamble, R. Troughton, A. Hamer, G. Devlin, S. Mann, A. Richards, J. French, H. White, C. Ellis, for the NZ Regional Cardiac Society ACS Audit Group and the CSANZ ‘SNAPSHOT’ ACS Audit Group
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

Implementation of a high sensitivity troponin assay reduces time spent in the emergency department by patients with a possible acute coronary syndrome

The cardiac troponin assay is widely used in Emergency Departments (EDs) to determine the likelihood that a patient’s symptoms represent an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We introduced a high sensitivity troponin assay (hs-cTnT) in 2010 to replace an earlier assay and a new more rapid triage protocol contingent on the improved performance of the assay. We wished to determine if the introduction of the new protocol reduced time spent in the ED.

A. Early, R. Cooke, M. Nguyen, S. Mann
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

Interested in joining CSANZ?