Posts Tagged ‘acs’

FFR in ACS

ANZET15 – Melbourne, 11-13 August 2015
9th Annual Australia & New Zealand Endovascular Therapies Meeting
Speaker: Andy Yong, NSW
Duration: 17 minutes

“Normal” coronary arteries in the setting of acute coronary syndrome: Frequency and outcomes

A proportion of patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) are found to have non-obstructive coronary disease on angiography. We investigated the frequency and impact of this finding in our ACS population.

S. Plunkett, A. Ranchord, P. Matsis, A. Holley, P. Larsen, S. Harding
Wellington Regional Hospital, Wellington
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

Does timing of platelet function testing (PFT) contribute to variability in residual on-treatment platelet reactivity in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS)?

ACS patients on dual antiplatelet therapy display large variations in residual platelet reactivity. In part, this may reflect the dynamic nature of the ACS process. Understanding the impact of the timing of measurement on this variability is required. This study examined the effect of time from symptom onset to testing and from antiplatelet agent loading to testing on residual platelet reactivity.

C. Legge, A. Al-Sinan, A. Holley, L. Johnston, P. Larsen, S. Harding
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

Variability and prognostic significance of antioxidant enzymes in acute coronary syndromes (ACS)

Glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) are antioxidant enzymes which scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) and protect against oxidative stress. The variance and prognostic significance of these enzymes in ACS is unclear. This study examined the relationship between GPx and SOD activity and MACE following ACS.

A. Holley, J. Miller, S. Harding, P. Larsen
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

Platelet count and platelet function testing in acute coronary syndromes

Platelet function testing may be a useful tool for tailoring antiplatelet therapy in acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Measurements of platelet function may be influenced by platelet count. We examined the relationship between platelet count and platelet function testing using two commercially available platelet function tests, VerifyNow and Multiplate.

K. Hally, L. Johnston, A. Holley, P. Larsen, S. Harding
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

Ticagrelor in the management of acute coronary syndromes

Ticagrelor reduces cardiovascular mortality in acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Limited data is available post hospital discharge particularly regarding compliance and tolerability. This study aimed to assess the use, adverse effects and patient opinion of ticagrelor, in comparison with PLATO trial findings.

S. Green, T. Cherian, C. Heald, M. Lee, G. Devlin
Waikato Hospital, Hamilton
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

Improved rates of secondary prevention medication following hospitalisation for an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in New Zealand (NZ): Results from the NZ ACS national audits of 2002, 2007 and 2012

Secondary prevention medications (aspirin, other anti-platelet agents, statins, beta-blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (ACE-I/ARBs)) following an Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) improve patients’ (pt) prognosis. The first National ACS audit (2002) identified a limited uptake of these medications. Subsequent audits in 2007 and 2012 allow comparison of the prescription rates over a decade.

C. Ellis, G. Gamble, G. Devlin, J. Elliott, A. Hamer, P. Matsis, M. Williams, R. Troughton, S. Mann, J. French, A. Richards, H. White, for the NZ Regional Cardiac Society ACS Audit Group and the CSANZ ‘SNAPSHOT’ ACS Audit Group.
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

A comparison of invasive angiography, revascularisation and time delays delivered to Australian and New Zealand non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction/unstable angina pectoris (NSTEMI/UAP) patients: results of the 2012 SNAPSHOT Bi-National acute coronary Syndrome (ACS) audit

Patients (pts) presenting with NSTEMI/UAP benefit from an invasive angiogram and appropriate revascularisation. Guidelines recommend the time to angiography should be < 24 hours for ‘high risk’ and < 72 hours for the remainder of these pts. We assessed New Zealand (NZ) and Australian (Aust) NSTEMI/UAP pts. C. Ellis, C. Hammett, J. French, T. Briffa, J. Lefkovitz, I. Ranasinghe, G. Devlin, J. Elliott, F. Turbull, J. Redfern, B. Aliprandi-Costa, C. Astley, G. Gamble, D. Brieger, D. Chew, for the Bi-National Acute Coronary Syndromes (ACS) ‘SNAPSHOT’ Audit Group Heart, Lung and Circulation - Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48 Abstract & full-text available.

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