Posts Tagged ‘acs’

Implementation of a high sensitivity troponin assay reduces time spent in the emergency department by patients with a possible acute coronary syndrome

The cardiac troponin assay is widely used in Emergency Departments (EDs) to determine the likelihood that a patient’s symptoms represent an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We introduced a high sensitivity troponin assay (hs-cTnT) in 2010 to replace an earlier assay and a new more rapid triage protocol contingent on the improved performance of the assay. We wished to determine if the introduction of the new protocol reduced time spent in the ED.

A. Early, R. Cooke, M. Nguyen, S. Mann
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

Spatial QRS-T angle following acute coronary syndromes

The ECG derived spatial QRS-T angle provides a measure of ventricular repolarisation abnormality, and enlarged QRS-T angle (greater than 100 degrees) has been correlated with increased mortality risk following acute coronary syndromes (ACS). In this study we examined the proportion of ACS patients with a greater than 100 degree QRS-T angle, and the effects of revascularisation following ACS on QRS-T angle.

S. Blomfield, B. Shi, S. Harding, P. Larsen
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

Acute coronary syndrome with non obstructive coronary angiography; Rates, treatment, and outcomes at Middlemore Hospital

Myocardial infarction with non obstructive coronary arteries (MINOCA) describes a heterogeneous subset of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) comprised of proven infarction, myocarditis, pericarditis, cardiomyopathy, and those with normal investigations. Internationally MINOCA accounts for ∼13% of ACS. Previously held as benign, MINOCA increases risk of death and MI. Internationally, fewer patients receive standard ACS treatments. We aim to characterise MINOCA rate, features, treatment and outcome.

P. Barr, A. Kerr
Middlemore Hospital Cardiology, Auckland
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

Temporary and permanent discontinuation of clopidogrel following acute coronary syndromes

Premature discontinuation of clopidogrel following an Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) has been linked to an increased risk of adverse events. We examined the frequency and causes of clopidogrel discontinuation in the first year following ACS.

D. Middleditch, B. Scott, M. Simmonds, A. Aitken, L. Johnston, P. Larsen, S. Harding
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

A comparison of discharge medications and rehabilitation services available for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients in Australia and New Zealand: Results of the 2012 SNAPSHOT Bi-National audit

Secondary prevention medication and rehabilitation services, for discharged ACS patients (pts), give important prognostic advantage, and are highlighted in New Zealand (NZ) and Australian (Aust) guidelines. We compared the rates of discharge medications and rehabilitation services for NZ and Aust ACS pts.

C. Ellis, T. Briffa, C. Hammet, J. French, J. Lefkovits, I. Ranasinghe, G. Devlin, J. Elliott, F. Turnbull, J. Redfern, B. Aliprandi-Costa, C. Astley, G. Gamble, D. Brieger, D. Chew, for the Bi-National Acute Coronary Syndromes (ACS) ‘SNAPSHOT’ Audit Group

Management of non ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTEACS) patients in New Zealand (NZ): A longitudinal analysis. Results from the NZACS national audits of 2002, 2007 and 2012

The first New Zealand Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) National audit of 2002 was a collaborative effort between Clinicians and Nurses and demonstrated important limitations to NSTEACS patient (pt) care. A momentum for change was created. Subsequent audits in 2007 and 2012 allow assessment over time.

G. Devlin, A. Hamer, R. Throughton, G. Gamble, P. Matsis, M. Williams, J. Elliott, S. Mann, A. Richards, J. French, H. White, C. Ellis, for the NZ Regional Cardiac Society ACS Audit Group and the CSANZ ‘SNAPSHOT’ ACS Audit Group

Resumption of platelet function by verify-now assay after cessation of ticagelor in acute coronary syndrome patients awaiting surgical revascularisation

Current guidelines recommend ceasing ticagrelor 5 days pre-operatively. A half-life of 14 hours and a twice-daily dosing regimen suggests this is longer than necessary for resumption of platelet function. We report the time course of platelet function following ticagrelor cessation in patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) referred for surgical revascularisation.

M. Lee, V. Pera, K. Sree Raman, G. Devlin, A. El-Gamel
Waikato Hospital, Hamilton
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

Management and long-term outcome in heart failure (HF) associated with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in a contemporary New Zealand cohort

There have been important changes in treatment over the last decade for ACS including increased use of revascularisation and improved medical therapy. Our aim was to assess the characteristics of those presenting with ACS and HF and their outcomes in a contemporary ACS cohort.

A. Kueh, M. Lee, G. Devlin, A. Kerr
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

The impact of body mass index on mortality and cardiovascular events following acute coronary syndrome: Is there an obesity paradox?

An obesity paradox has been described following acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with a counter intuitive finding of better outcomes in obese patients compared to those of normal weight. We sought to assess this phenomenon in our own institution.

J. Sathananthan, M. Lee, A. Kerr
Middlemore Hospital, Counties Manukau District Health Board, Auckland

Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

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