Posts Tagged ‘angiography’

CT coronary angiography reporting in New Zealand – a survey of practitioners.

CT Coronary Angiography (CTCA) is an increasingly utilised cardiac imaging technique. There is currently little data regarding the doctors that report cardiac CT in New Zealand. This study aimed to describe the CTCA reporting workforce in New Zealand.

C. Young
Department of Cardiology, Tauranga Hospital, Tauranga
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

Value of normal or mild coronary artery disease on angiography during workup of suspected angina pectoris

Coronary angiography is the standard technique for assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD). In many patients investigated with angiography, no or minimal CAD (<50% stenosis) is detected. It is uncertain how this “negative” result influences subsequent management and outcomes. We reviewed characteristics and outcomes in a contemporary cohort of patients with suspected angina pectoris and subsequently “negative” coronary angiography. T. Wang, T. Oh, C. Samaranayake, T. Watson, J. Stewart, M. Webster, C. Ellis, P. Ruygrok Heart, Lung and Circulation - Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48 Abstract & full-text available.

Prevalence of obstructive coronary artery disease among patients undergoing coronary angiography at an Australian Tertiary Hospital

Previous studies from overseas have suggested that many patients undergoing coronary angiograms are found to have normal coronary arteries. Excessive use of coronary angiography leads to wasteful health spending and puts patients at risk. Australia has a publicly funded health system, so it is particularly pertinent to ensure appropriate use of health care resources. The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of coronary artery disease in a contemporary cohort of Australian patients undergoing coronary angiography.

D. Tsang, M. Yudi, S. Joshi
Cardiology Department, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Australia
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

Percutaneous coronary intervention rates and outcomes of coronary angiography in patients with prior CABG – an ANZACS-QI single centre study

Coronary angiography in patients with previous coronary artery bypass grafts(CABG) is technically more difficult, increases lab time, radiation exposure and has been linked to higher in-hospital complications and mortality. We sought to study this by comparing those who underwent coronary angiography with previous CABG versus those without.

G. Sathananthan, C. Flynn, D. Scott, P. Kay, W. Harrison, A. Kerr
Middlemore Hospital, Auckland
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

“Normal” coronary arteries in the setting of acute coronary syndrome: Frequency and outcomes

A proportion of patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) are found to have non-obstructive coronary disease on angiography. We investigated the frequency and impact of this finding in our ACS population.

S. Plunkett, A. Ranchord, P. Matsis, A. Holley, P. Larsen, S. Harding
Wellington Regional Hospital, Wellington
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

Total ambulatory care (TAC) for day-stay coronary angiography patients (Amsterdam protocol): A positive response with suggested enhancements

TAC seeks to deconstruct the traditional approach to diagnostic and interventional procedures: Long periods without food or drink, impersonal and unflattering attire, strong procedural sedation, restriction of movement and boredom. Radial artery access angiography allows us the opportunity to address these issues and provide patient-friendly care.

M. McAleer, S. Madenholt-Titley, S. Savage, T. Gudex, J. White, P. Ruygrok
Auckland District Health Board, Auckland
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

Reduced sedation in patients undergoing coronary angiography of total ambulatory management Online Only

Midazolam and fentanyl are routinely used for coronary angiography via a radial approach to reduce patient anxiety, pain and arterial spasm. This has implications for ambulation, time to discharge and work-flow efficiency. There is little evidence to support the routine use of “up-front” intravenous sedation and analgesia compared to “as required” and using local anaesthesia alone.

S. MadenHolt-Titley, T. Gudex, M. McAleer, S. Savage, J. White, P. Ruygrok
Auckland District Health Board, Auckland
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

Introduction and evaluation of total ambulatory management of patients undergoing coronary angiography and intervention

Transradial coronary angiography and intervention has permitted the introduction of “demedicalised” total ambulatory care. We aimed to assess the feasibility and success of this strategy for day case coronary angiography/PCI at Auckland City Hospital.

T. Gudex, S. Madenholt-Titley, M. McAleer, S. Savage, J. White, P. Ruygrok
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

A comparison of invasive angiography, revascularisation and time delays delivered to Australian and New Zealand non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction/unstable angina pectoris (NSTEMI/UAP) patients: results of the 2012 SNAPSHOT Bi-National acute coronary Syndrome (ACS) audit

Patients (pts) presenting with NSTEMI/UAP benefit from an invasive angiogram and appropriate revascularisation. Guidelines recommend the time to angiography should be < 24 hours for ‘high risk’ and < 72 hours for the remainder of these pts. We assessed New Zealand (NZ) and Australian (Aust) NSTEMI/UAP pts. C. Ellis, C. Hammett, J. French, T. Briffa, J. Lefkovitz, I. Ranasinghe, G. Devlin, J. Elliott, F. Turbull, J. Redfern, B. Aliprandi-Costa, C. Astley, G. Gamble, D. Brieger, D. Chew, for the Bi-National Acute Coronary Syndromes (ACS) ‘SNAPSHOT’ Audit Group Heart, Lung and Circulation - Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48 Abstract & full-text available.

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