Posts Tagged ‘Ellis’

Value of normal or mild coronary artery disease on angiography during workup of suspected angina pectoris

Coronary angiography is the standard technique for assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD). In many patients investigated with angiography, no or minimal CAD (<50% stenosis) is detected. It is uncertain how this “negative” result influences subsequent management and outcomes. We reviewed characteristics and outcomes in a contemporary cohort of patients with suspected angina pectoris and subsequently “negative” coronary angiography. T. Wang, T. Oh, C. Samaranayake, T. Watson, J. Stewart, M. Webster, C. Ellis, P. Ruygrok Heart, Lung and Circulation - Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48 Abstract & full-text available.

Features and outcomes of eosinophilic myocarditis: A single-centre case series

Eosinophilic myocarditis (EM) is a rare and potentially fatal entity characterised by inflammation with infiltrating eosinophils. Limited published data are available documenting presentation, management and prognosis. We report these data in a series of patients with EM treated at Auckland City Hospital.

T. Wang, T. Watson, B. Lowe, J. Pemberton, N. Kingston, C. Ellis, P. Ruygrok
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

Improved rates of secondary prevention medication following hospitalisation for an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in New Zealand (NZ): Results from the NZ ACS national audits of 2002, 2007 and 2012

Secondary prevention medications (aspirin, other anti-platelet agents, statins, beta-blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (ACE-I/ARBs)) following an Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) improve patients’ (pt) prognosis. The first National ACS audit (2002) identified a limited uptake of these medications. Subsequent audits in 2007 and 2012 allow comparison of the prescription rates over a decade.

C. Ellis, G. Gamble, G. Devlin, J. Elliott, A. Hamer, P. Matsis, M. Williams, R. Troughton, S. Mann, J. French, A. Richards, H. White, for the NZ Regional Cardiac Society ACS Audit Group and the CSANZ ‘SNAPSHOT’ ACS Audit Group.
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

A comparison of invasive angiography, revascularisation and time delays delivered to Australian and New Zealand non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction/unstable angina pectoris (NSTEMI/UAP) patients: results of the 2012 SNAPSHOT Bi-National acute coronary Syndrome (ACS) audit

Patients (pts) presenting with NSTEMI/UAP benefit from an invasive angiogram and appropriate revascularisation. Guidelines recommend the time to angiography should be < 24 hours for ‘high risk’ and < 72 hours for the remainder of these pts. We assessed New Zealand (NZ) and Australian (Aust) NSTEMI/UAP pts. C. Ellis, C. Hammett, J. French, T. Briffa, J. Lefkovitz, I. Ranasinghe, G. Devlin, J. Elliott, F. Turbull, J. Redfern, B. Aliprandi-Costa, C. Astley, G. Gamble, D. Brieger, D. Chew, for the Bi-National Acute Coronary Syndromes (ACS) ‘SNAPSHOT’ Audit Group Heart, Lung and Circulation - Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48 Abstract & full-text available.

A decade of improvement in investigations received and treatments delivered to New Zealand (NZ) ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients: Results from the NZACS national audits of 2002, 2007 and 2012

The first New Zealand (NZ) Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) National audit of 2002 was a collaborative effort between Clinicians and Nurses and demonstrated significant limitations to STEMI patient (pt) care. A momentum for change was created. Subsequent audits in 2007 and 2012 permit comparison of treatments and investigations over time.

J. Elliott, M. Williams, P. Matsis, G. Gamble, R. Troughton, A. Hamer, G. Devlin, S. Mann, A. Richards, J. French, H. White, C. Ellis, for the NZ Regional Cardiac Society ACS Audit Group and the CSANZ ‘SNAPSHOT’ ACS Audit Group
Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 1, e1-e48
Abstract & full-text available.

A comparison of discharge medications and rehabilitation services available for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients in Australia and New Zealand: Results of the 2012 SNAPSHOT Bi-National audit

Secondary prevention medication and rehabilitation services, for discharged ACS patients (pts), give important prognostic advantage, and are highlighted in New Zealand (NZ) and Australian (Aust) guidelines. We compared the rates of discharge medications and rehabilitation services for NZ and Aust ACS pts.

C. Ellis, T. Briffa, C. Hammet, J. French, J. Lefkovits, I. Ranasinghe, G. Devlin, J. Elliott, F. Turnbull, J. Redfern, B. Aliprandi-Costa, C. Astley, G. Gamble, D. Brieger, D. Chew, for the Bi-National Acute Coronary Syndromes (ACS) ‘SNAPSHOT’ Audit Group

Management of non ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTEACS) patients in New Zealand (NZ): A longitudinal analysis. Results from the NZACS national audits of 2002, 2007 and 2012

The first New Zealand Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) National audit of 2002 was a collaborative effort between Clinicians and Nurses and demonstrated important limitations to NSTEACS patient (pt) care. A momentum for change was created. Subsequent audits in 2007 and 2012 allow assessment over time.

G. Devlin, A. Hamer, R. Throughton, G. Gamble, P. Matsis, M. Williams, J. Elliott, S. Mann, A. Richards, J. French, H. White, C. Ellis, for the NZ Regional Cardiac Society ACS Audit Group and the CSANZ ‘SNAPSHOT’ ACS Audit Group

Elevated Lipoprotein (a) level is more predictive of coronary atheroma burden than family history in intermediate and high risk- implications for screening algorithms

International Clinical Cardiovascular Genetics Conference, Brisbane 6-8 August 2014
Published in Heart, Lung and Circulation – Volume 23, Supplement 2, e1-e20
Abstract & full-text available

Lipoprotein (a) (Lp(a)) level is genetically determined. The relationship between Lp(a), family history (FHx) and coronary calcium score (CACS) has not been fully defined.

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